Driverless cars, bikes, and the future of urban transportation at Smart Cities NYC

This May 3 to May 6, the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s Duggal Greenhouse is hosting the inaugural Smart Cities NYC conference and expo. Smart Cities NYC is ambitious in its scope, with a global selection of speakers whose backgrounds include government, the tech industry, academia, real estate/development, and design. Autonomous vehicles, public health, construction technology, resilient urban landscapes, and the Internet of Things (IoT) are just a few of the subjects being discussed.

Transportation was a fixture of the first day’s programming. At the “Integrated Urban Mobility” panel, the conversation revolved around how car and bike sharing companies were changing cities and their streetscapes. The panel kicked off with an urban design question: How will cities treat curbside parking now that, with the advent of car sharing, it’s less necessary? Now that it’s free for other uses, “space along the curb [may soon] be very valuable,” said Jay Walder, CEO of bike share company Motivate. However, “one of the most challenging things cities need to do” is to determine how to regulate, share, and maintain these spaces as private care ownership disappears.

While parking may be a relative afterthought for architects, it was a critical part of the transportation future for the panelists. Aaron Landry, general manager of car2go North America (a car-sharing service), explained how his company minimizes how long its cars occupy curbside space. By predicting and optimizing where car pickups and dropoffs happen, car2go’s vehicles are rarely parked for long. Developers are also fighting parking requirements in new developments, instead opting to provide residents with transit subsidies or dedicated car share pickup/dropoff/storage points. Without parking requirements, developers can allot less valuable land to unproductive hardtop.

Read the full article at; www.archpaper.com

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